July 26, 2017

Random Acts… Words of sorrow, words of joy

Posted in Books, Entertainment, Health, Women at 1:04 am by dinaheng

My mom died in April. My dad died two months later. The part of me that died with them is just starting to heal.

Each day, Life sends us messages, if we pay attention, the messages offer guidance for how to deal with pain, how to appreciate joyful moments, how to remember that we are not alone.

Sometimes the message comes from a friend who sends flowers, out of the blue. Two arrangements came this week. Or an assignment for work hits you with such synchronicity that you know it’s not a coincidence. My mom died of stomach cancer. I was asked to interview Emmy-nominated actor Ron Cephas Jones, whose character William on NBC’s hit show “This Is Us” died of stomach cancer.

(Here’s a link to that story, if you’re interested… http://www.emmys.org/news/online-originals/celebrating-life .)

The other night, I went to a screening of “Wind River,” a murder mystery starring Jeremy Renner as a wildlife official in Wyoming who’s learned to deal with the death of his teenage daughter, three years earlier. He gives advice to a friend dealing with the death of his daughter, the murder victim, telling him not to block out the pain, because pain is what keeps the memory of loved ones alive.

Today, it is the memories that bring on sadness. I open the weekly advertising circular that comes in the mail, looking at the sales at grocery stores. It reminds me of Mom, who always looked at the circulars, scanning for food items that the family would enjoy, even though she couldn’t swallow solid food anymore.

Whenever we talked on the phone, she would ask, “Have you eaten yet?” To my mom, who once starved in China as a child, the words were the same as saying, “Are you doing okay? I love you.”

Going out to eat lunch was something my dad and I used to do every time I went home for a visit before he became too weak to walk anymore. He’d either want to go to a hole-in-the-wall Chinese restaurant, or a fast food place for burgers or roast beef sandwiches. Whenever I drive by a Burger King or Subway, I think of him.

The words he always asked me were, “When are you going to move back home?” In father speak, that meant, “I miss seeing you.”

Last night, I finished reading “The Reluctant Queen” by Sarah Beth Durst (Harper Voyager, $19.99), the latest in a great fantasy series about a world where dangerous spirits and humans coexist only through the magic wielded by its queens.

These are the words of that leapt out of its pages at me…

“I could tell you that time will heal you, but I think that’s a cruel thing to say, because right now, you don’t want time to heal you. You don’t want to forget. Because forgetting means that they’re really gone…

“…I do want you to forget this… the pain that feels as if it’s eating your skin and consuming your soul. I want you instead to remember the moments they made you smile, or cry, the moments they made you feel alive. I want you to honor the ways they shaped who you are and who you will become. For they are a part of you, now and forever.

“… (Your pain) is uniquely yours, and it is all right to feel it fully and deeply for today and for as many days as you need to feel it, until you can feel joy again…”

It’s good to know that Life is always reaching out to us.

 

May 10, 2017

Random Acts… When your mother is gone

Posted in Health, Women at 6:36 pm by dinaheng

My mother passed a few weeks ago.

She fought stomach cancer for more than two years, going through radiation treatments and chemotherapy to eek out one more day with her children and grandchildren.

My sisters and I did our best to take care of her, so that she would be able to die at home when the time came. For the last six months, I have been flying back and forth between Los Angeles and Houston to help out, spending more and more time with her until the end. It was the best thing I’ve ever done.

You never really know what it means to lose a parent until it happens to you. If we’re lucky enough to have parents who are still living, we usually take their presence for granted. Mothers and fathers, after all, are supposed to be the ones whose lives revolve around us.

But when we realize that time with the ones we love is truly limited, everything changes. Suddenly, losing income is not as important as losing precious moments with Mom. Losing the “normalcy” of everyday routines doesn’t matter when you’re needed to take her to the emergency room, again and again.

Losing sleep doesn’t matter when your body instinctively wakes up at 4 a.m. to check and see if Mom needs help to go to the bathroom. Losing your appetite means little when you watch your mother become unable to eat anything that’s not thinly pureed or liquid.

Together, we went through the ups and downs of remission and the return of cancer. I held her hand as she made moaning sounds, unable to talk about her fears, and watched her struggle to get into the wheelchair when she was too weak to walk anymore. Through it all, she never gave up hope of living… one more day.

The week she died, I left Houston on Wednesday, telling her I would be back in two days. She passed the next day. I guess she couldn’t wait for me to return.

The days have been a blur since then. I cry whenever anything reminds me of her. I am grateful that just as she brought my sisters and me into this world, we were able to help her pass into the next.

This Mother’s Day, a friend — who also recently lost her mom — and I will be having lunch together to celebrate our mothers. I’m sure we’ll both have plenty of memories to laugh and cry about.

That’s what happens when you live life to the fullest.

 

January 3, 2017

Random Acts… Past and present connect in new tales

Posted in Books, Politics, Women at 10:09 pm by dinaheng

Everything in life is connected. The things we do today affect what happens tomorrow. The things we did yesterday affect what happens today.

Two authors explore that concept in different, intriguing ways in their latest novels.Dinah Eng

James Rollins, whose adventures often combine historical mystery and scientific exploration, has penned a thriller about an ancient plague that could wipe out the modern world in “The Seventh Plague” (William Morrow, on sale now).

In the book, which features characters from Rollins’ Sigma Force series, the leader of a British archaeological expedition stumbles out of the Sudanese desert, two years after vanishing with his research team. He dies before he can share what happened to him, and reveal who had begun to mummify his body – while he was still alive.

When the medical team who performs the archaeologist’s autopsy dies from an unknown illness, Painter Crowe, the director of Sigma Force, summons his team to investigate. Helping the team is the archaeologist’s only daughter, Jane McCabe, who discovers a connection between what is happening in the present and a historical mystery involving the travels of Mark Twain, the research of Nikola Tesla and the fate of explorer Henry Morgan Stanley.

"The Seventh Plague" by James Rollins. Book cover courtesy of William Morrow.

“The Seventh Plague” by James Rollins. Book cover courtesy of William Morrow.

Rollins explores the question of whether a virus could have caused the Biblical plagues, and whether today’s society is really ready to deal with global pandemics. Noting in the book that the Zika virus originated in a monkey in Uganda, the organism in the book is in the same family of viruses, causing birth defects and death, but only in male children.

The author, whose parents recently passed away from complications secondary to Alzheimer’s, dedicated the book to them. One of the main characters in the book, Commander Gray Pierce, grapples with the challenge of caring for a father whose Alzheimer’s has worsened throughout the series, and clearly reflects an experience felt by all who have aging parents.

When it comes to understanding the complexity of scientific issues, Rollins does a great job of using facts to keep readers guessing as his plot unfolds. Whether humanity is truly ready to face the crises that climate change and potential pandemics will bring is anybody’s guess.

Facing crises of faith and magical battles is at the center of “Heartstone” by Elle Katharine White (Harper Voyager, on sale Jan. 17, 2017), an absorbing reimagining of Jane Austen’s classic “Pride and Prejudice.”

In this tale, White weaves an historical fantasy with characters who live in a world where gryphons and direwolves battle dragonriders and wyverns. The heroine, a headstrong Aliza Bentaine, is as resourceful and brave as Austen’s Lizzy Bennet, facing both the demons that threaten the kingdom and her fears about falling in love with the haughty dragonrider, Alastair Daired (known as Mr. Darcy in Austen’s world).

"Heartstone" by Elle Katharine White. Book cover courtesy of Harper Voyager.

“Heartstone” by Elle Katharine White. Book cover courtesy of Harper Voyager.

Despite its connection to “Pride and Prejudice,” this story stands on its own with a well-crafted plot, passionate characters who come to life, and themes exploring class lines and what true love entails.

When Anjey, Aliza’s sister, falls in love with Cedric Brysney, a dragonrider and Alastair’s friend, the two seem destined for each other. But when duty calls, Cedric must leave, and the separation tests the faith each has in the other. Little do they suspect that someone is scheming to break them apart.

When Aliza is called to help an aunt and uncle who live near the Daired estate, she investigates why Cedric has not replied to any of Anjey’s letters. The answer to this romantic mystery unfolds as an even greater threat to humanity surfaces. (There are monsters aplenty in this realm).

As in all things, past connections bring present crises to the fore in this tale, which affirms the power of love to heal all wounds. For those who love classic romance and stories set in magical settings, “Heartstone” is a tale worth reading.

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 16, 2016

Random Acts… Finding “My Christmas Love” a Joy

Posted in Entertainment, Movies, Relationships, Television, Women at 3:22 am by dinaheng

When it comes to holiday movies, Hallmark Channel’s Countdown to Christmas is a sure bet for films that convey the nostalgia and true meaning of the season.

This weekend, a sweet tale about a children’s book author who’s always searching for – and never finding — the perfect love, unfolds in “My Christmas Love,” which airs Saturday, Dec. 17 at 8 p.m. Eastern.Dinah Eng

In the movie, author Cynthia Manning (played by Meredith Hagner) returns to her family home for her sister’s wedding, and invites her illustrator and best friend Liam Pollak (Bobby Campo) to join her for the holidays.

When a series of presents, reflecting each day in “The 12 Days of Christmas,” is delivered to her father’s doorstep, Cynthia is convinced that one of her former boyfriends is behind the deed.

Jeff Fisher, the director of the film, was hooked by the premise.

“I love romantic comedies,” Fisher says. “If you go on a journey with someone in the film, and they find love and happiness, you’re along for the ride. Romantic comedies make people happier when they leave the theater, their TV or their phone.”

Fisher, who has produced reality TV shows (“Keeping Up with the Kardashians”, “Flip It to Win It” and others), says “My Christmas Love” is a return to the genres he loves best – romantic comedies and musicals.

Bobby Campo and  Meredith Hagner star in "My Christmas Love."  Copyright 2016 Crown Media United States LLC/Photographer: Fred Hayes

Bobby Campo and Meredith Hagner star in “My Christmas Love.” Copyright 2016 Crown Media United States LLC/Photographer: Fred Hayes

“My first short films were in those genres,” Fisher says. “To pay those films off, I got some reality TV jobs, then my first movies (“Killer Movie” and “Killer Reality”) were off issues from the reality TV shows.”

“My Christmas Love” is probably as far from horror and reality TV shows as audiences can get. The importance of celebrating Christmas with family is central to the plot, as Cynthia’s dad, Tom Manning (Gregory Harrison), is a new widower who must be encouraged to get out into the community to enjoy the spirit of the holidays again.

As Cynthia searches for her “true love,” her father reminds her that life’s answers are often right in front of our noses.

“I liked Cynthia’s Nancy Drew personality, looking for who sent the presents,” Fisher says, “and I loved the twist of who’s behind the gifts.”

The film, he says, was shot in various cities in Utah, which offered a good tax incentive to the filmmakers.

Shooting the film in Utah, however, may be the reason why the film lacks diverse casting. The only minority face in the movie belongs to actress Yolanda Wood, who had a brief speaking role in the beginning of the film playing Sandra, the hostess of a café that Cynthia often patronizes.

“There can always be more diversity in films,” Fisher says. “I don’t know how diverse Salt Lake City is, since a lot of our supporting actors came from there.”

Regardless, love is a universal language, and the holidays are meant to be celebrated. To see whether Cynthia finds her true love, tune into “My Christmas Love.”

November 10, 2016

HE is now “The Queen of Blood”

Posted in Books, Diversity, Politics, Women at 6:27 pm by dinaheng

Everything has a spirit… from the land that is parched by drought to the sea that rises like a tsunami when angry. In human beings, the spirit that has driven Americans through this presidential election has been fear and loathing.

Now that Donald Trump has won the contest, the true test of leadership begins.Dinah Eng

I couldn’t help but think of our presidential candidates as I read Sarah Beth Durst’s insightful fantasy, “The Queen of Blood” (Harper Voyager, 350 pp). In Durst’s novel, the realm of Renthia is ruled by queens who must prove that they can control the spirits that inhabit the world around them.

While we live in a nation that has yet to elect a female president, all those who hold the office get there by convincing voters that they are the best candidate to control the forces that determine our economy, our nation’s defense, and our foreign policy. Of course, no one can control anything except the way we behave toward others.

The heroine in Book One of this saga is Daleina, a young woman whose village was destroyed by rampaging spirits when she was a child. Determined to prevent the carnage from happening to others, Daleina trains to become a potential heir to the throne of Aratay, learning to use magic to bend the spirits to her will.

The spirits in this world are easily understood. The spirits of the trees want to grow. The spirits of the air want to fly. Whatever the element, plant or animal, its wish is to fulfill its natural inclination and purpose. At the same time, the spirits want to kill human beings.

Courtesy of Harper Voyager.

Courtesy of Harper Voyager.

So it is that Trump has used great showmanship to persuade a society that worships celebrities and tawdry gossip to choose him for our leader.

America has voted for change, and we must be grateful that change is always possible in a democracy. Let us hope that Trump ends up doing more to bring us together than his campaign rhetoric did.

For too long, partisanship has divided us. It took a shocking election wake up call for those long in power to hear the deep-seated anger of those who feel powerless and in pain.

What people in pain don’t always realize, though, is that change for change’s sake is never enough. When Trump supporters see that he will not fulfill the campaign promises that were only designed to win protest votes, will they grow even angrier? Will those who voted against him stretch the partisan divide even more?

Or will we all come to understand that Hillary Rodham Clinton’s message that we are stronger together really is the only way to make America great again?

In “The Queen of Blood,” Daleina is not the smartest or strongest potential heir, but she is a young woman who, above all else, wants to do the right thing. It is only after many spirits and humans are slaughtered that she rises to take the throne.

None of us really know what is in Donald Trump’s heart. We can only hope that the Office of the President of the United States challenges him to be better than anyone imagines.

In Renthia, each queen is chosen by the spirits when the previous queen dies, and must keep the world thriving with natural forces while taking care of the needs of the people.

Clinton’s concession speech showed the kind of leader she is, gracious and inspiring, even in defeat.

Trump must now show what kind of spirit truly lies within him.

 

June 1, 2016

Random Acts… Good reads for summertime

Posted in Books, Uncategorized, Women at 4:21 pm by dinaheng

Romantic suspense… science fiction… a sweet tale about an awkward, lovable creature. What more could you want for a good summertime read?

Dinah EngWhen Morgan Yancy, a covert team leader of a paramiltary group, is shot and nearly killed, his supervisor sends him to an isolated town in West Virginia to hide and recuperate. Little does Yancy know that his housemate, Isabeau “Bo” Maran, the part-time police chief of Hamricksville, is about to change the course of his life.

Courtesy of William Morrow

Courtesy of William Morrow

In “Troublemaker,” by Linda Howard ($26.99, William Morrow), romance and suspense combine for some fun summertime reading. Unlike many novels in this genre, the suspense takes a backseat to the romance. Most of the book explores how two wounded souls, brought together by the antics of Bo’s dog Tricks, help each other to heal.

The danger is muted in this tale, with the mystery of why Yancy was shot being solved almost as an after-thought at the end of the book. This is not a page turning thriller. But with a satisfying romance at the core of the story, who cares?

Fans of romance, mystery, and science fiction will enjoy “The Cold Between,” a debut novel by Elizabeth Bonesteel ($16.99, Harper Voyager) that sets up a universe where Central Corps engineer Commander Elena Shaw is determined to prove that her lover, Treiko Zajec, a former pirate, did not kill her crewmate on the colony of Volhynia.

Courtesy of Harper Voyager

Courtesy of Harper Voyager

After helping Trey escape the authorities, the two head into a wormhole, seeking answers to the murder, which may be tied to a government conspiracy that threatens the balance of power for all human civilizations. Galactic politics, it seems, is the same no matter which universe you hail from.

While the first third of the book starts slowly, the story picks up its pace and complexity with each page. Ancillary characters in the novel are well drawn, setting up the hope for more stories about the crew of the CCSS Galileo.

For younger readers, a charming picture book titled “Hello, My Name Is Octicorn” by Kevin Diller and Justin Lowe ($17.99, Balzer + Bray) speaks to anyone who has ever felt a little different.

Courtesy of Balzer + Bray

Courtesy of Balzer + Bray

Little Octi is half-octopus, half-unicorn, and more than a little sad because “when you don’t fit in, you don’t get invited to a lot of parties.” He shares his various talents – like being good at lots of sports, a good juggler, and a terrific dancer.

If others would only give him a chance, an octicorn would make a great friend “because in the end, we all want the same things. Cupcakes, friends, and a jet ski.”

Truer words were never spoken.

 

 

 

 

May 29, 2015

Random Acts… Much ado about something

Posted in Dining, Relationships, Women at 11:22 pm by dinaheng

It was a Friday night at Umami Burger in Los Angeles. The restaurant was full of diners, chattering over their meals. A friend and I were seated in a booth when the couple on the other side of our booth started arguing. Let me rephrase that – the man in the other booth started yelling at the woman.

Cursing up a storm, he berated his companion for not appreciating the food that he, apparently, was paying for. No one seemed to be paying attention to his tirade except me, as I was looking straight at him.Dinah Eng

Then, he picked up his water glass and threw it toward his companion.

The glass shattered, half on the booth next to his companion, and half in our booth. Conversations immediately ceased, and anyone who was pretending to ignore the fellow turned to see what he would do next.

The man continued to curse at his companion, who remained silent through his tirade. Three waiters walked up to the man and asked him to leave. I kept thinking, “Please leave peacefully. Please don’t have a gun.”

After arguing with one of the waiters, the man left, declaring his right to use profanity in public, while continuing to swear at his female companion. A few seconds later, she got up, uninjured, and embarrassed.  Then she followed him out the door.

Once the couple left, people began talking again, as though everything were back to normal. I’m sure the conversations were about what had happened, but it felt eerie to see people laughing, as though the scene had just been a made-up moment from some TV show.

I had never witnessed such a tirade, tinged with the threat of violence, in a restaurant before. I was thankful that neither my friend nor I were cut by any of the flying glass, and I was sad that the man’s companion had left with him. She had said not one peep during his screaming rant, and that spoke volumes.

 

March 20, 2015

Random Acts… You are a blessing

Posted in Business, Relationships, Spirituality, Women at 4:59 pm by dinaheng

My friend Christine is an angel. No matter what happens in life, she invariably thinks of the feelings of others.

One day, she thought about an old Reader’s Digest article that talked about a teacher who had a somewhat unruly class. To change people’s attitudes, the teacher had everyone write the names of all the students in the class on separate pieces of paper.Dinah Eng

Underneath each name, the assignment was to write down something you liked about that person. Each person then got the slips of paper with their names on it. Imagine how good each student felt to read all that positive feedback. And yes, doing that exercise changed the entire class’s demeanor – toward each other and, no doubt, toward themselves.

Christine decided to do something similar to brighten the lives of the people she meets.

She printed up some business-size cards with the message, “Thank you! I appreciate you and the way you have helped me today. Life is full of blessings, and you are one of them. Christine.”

“I give them out to waiters, people who hold the elevator open for me, anyone who’s done a good deed,” says Christine, a former space biologist for NASA who lives outside Nashville, Tenn. “I carry them in my wallet, and try to spread them out as much as possible. I just thought it might help people who are having a bad day.”You are a blessing card

The responses she’s gotten are more than gratifying.

“I gave one to the receptionist at a doctor’s office, and she clutched it to her chest with tears in her eyes,” Christine says. “She must have been having a really bad day, and needed it.”

Christine’s act of kindness is a reminder of how much we all need to be valued and appreciated, whether it’s through a smile, a kind word, or the gift of a blessing card.

We all have the power to affect the attitudes and behavior of those around us. We can set a tone of respect around ourselves that ripples out into the world.

Imagine, as Christine does, a business environment where managers and employees take the time to verbally appreciate and thank each other for the things they do every day. How would that change people’s attitudes about their colleagues? How would that change attitudes about going to work every day, and the quality of customer service then provided?

Imagine a Congress and White House where government officials looked first at what they admire in other people, rather than judge others by nothing more than a party name.

How would the world change if churches, mosques, and synagogues respected the highest values in each other’s faith, without trying to make everyone else adhere to their beliefs?

Christine’s friendship is a cherished blessing in my life. If her blessing card inspires you to pass some kindness along, please write and let me know. The more good stories we share, the more the world will change… for the better.

February 1, 2015

Random Acts… Choices never easy, even in ‘Hindsight’

Posted in Entertainment, Television, Women at 1:51 am by dinaheng

Decisions, decisions.

We make thousands of decisions every day, both major and minor, which affect everything from our health to personal relationships to our careers. Those choices, in turn, affect the people around us – both those we know, and those we don’t know.Dinah Eng

Most of us probably spend a lot of brainpower parsing out the major decisions, analyzing problems to death, for fear that we’ll make the wrong choice. Yet the best choices are usually the ones that come instinctively from the heart.

Think of a really big moment in your life 10 or 20 years ago. Did you make the right decision? If you had to do it over again, would you make the same choice? If you chose differently, how different would your life be today? Would you still have ended up in the same place?

In “Hindsight,” a new drama on VH1, a woman named Becca (played by Laura Ramsey) explores those questions on the eve of her second wedding. Thinking about her former best friend Lolly (Sarah Goldberg), and the argument that ended their friendship years ago, triggers an out-of-this-reality trip to the past as Becca suddenly wakes up in New York City on the morning of her first wedding day in 1995.

Becca (Laura Ramsey) and Lolly (Sarah Goldberg) in "Hindsight." Photo courtesy of VH1.

Becca (Laura Ramsey) and Lolly (Sarah Goldberg) in “Hindsight.” Photo courtesy of VH1.

Will she still marry Sean (Craig Horner), knowing now that her artist fiancé was a man who never took responsibility for his own life? Will she continue working for the boss who never seems to recognize her talent? Will she make things right with the best friend who was her sister of the heart?

Life’s choices are never easy. We make decisions from limited points of view, hoping for the best outcomes. We never know how our decisions will affect others, so the best we can do is be gentle with our words and kind with our actions.

If we’re lucky, whatever our choices were, we won’t have to live with regret.

The choices Becca makes takes us all on an interesting journey of “what ifs.”

You can catch “Hindsight” on Wednesdays at 9 p.m. Eastern on VH1.

July 7, 2014

Random Acts… Sisters sample Big Apple in quick getaway

Posted in Dining, Entertainment, Travel, Women at 5:47 pm by dinaheng

If you only have two and a half days to sample the Big Apple, what do you do?

My sister Linda and I decided to get a small taste of our favorite things, and alternated cheap with luxurious along the way.

First off, we arrived the cheap way, taking a Newark Airport Express Bus ($16 fare) from the airport to the Port Authority Bus Terminal at Times Square, then grabbed a cab for a quick ride to the nearby Michaelangelo hotel on 51st and 7th Avenue.Dinah Eng

When it comes to luxury in the city that never sleeps, there’s nothing more luxurious than a truly quiet hotel room. The Michaelangelo, a midtown boutique with an Italian theme, offers wonderfully quiet and spacious rooms in a prime location. The elegant chandeliers, tufted sofas, and marble floors in its lobby are echoed in the plush carpeted rooms with marble bathrooms and gilded mirrors.

Complimentary coffee and pastries are available for breakfast in the lounge, as well as a 24-hour fitness center. This is not a hotel for business travelers, as there is no business center, but there is a multilingual concierge and a friendly — albeit understaffed — front desk that makes up for having to wait in line at various times. Summertime rates can run from $294 to $608 a night.

After walking through Times Square, looking for souvenirs for our nieces and nephews, we settled on t-shirts for the New York Yankees fan and some generic Big Apple symbols for the others. In search of a movie theater, we then wandered into the AMC Empire 25 on W. 42nd Street.

When three ticket machines didn’t work, we got in line and bought tickets for “X-Men: Days of Future Past.” The ticket seller forgot to give a receipt for the tickets, so I ended up in another line at guest services for that. Standing in line is something you get used to in this town. After the show, we grabbed a late take-out dinner of a burger for Linda and an omelette for me at one of the city’s ubiquitous, and totally forgettable, all-night diners.

The next day, we made up for the diner disappointment by checking out the $15 lunch special at Pazza Notte (1375 Sixth Avenue near 56th Street), an open-front restaurant with a lively bar crowd, even at the noon hour. This sweet little Italian eatery offers generous portions, so Linda and I shared some delicious Calamari Fritti and tried a couple of pasta entrees. Lunch was carbolicious, reasonably priced, and totally yummy.

To waddle off some calories, we took the subway (still a bargain at $2.50 for a single ride) in search of shopping. A friend gave us a behind-the-scenes tour of the Vince Camuto handbag showroom, then took us to the Vince Camuto store on 34th Street, where we browsed through shoes, handbags and jewelry by the designer who launched the Nine West brand, and picked out a few goodies.

Camuto, who now has his own brand, is also the design talent behind other brands like Jessica Simpson and BCBG. If you’re like me, and love flats, I can’t rave enough about his Louise de Cie shoes, made with soft, supple leather that makes you feel like you’re walking on a cloud.

As the afternoon drew to a close, Linda and I joined rush hour commuters on a subway down to the Financial District where we took in the new 9/11 Memorial Museum. The National September 11 Memorial Museum at the World Trade Center honors the nearly 3,000 victims of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, and those who risked their lives to save others. Walking toward the entrance, I thought about that terrible morning, and the event that shocked the world. I was in Washington, D.C., attending a meeting, and turned on the television in time to see the second plane strike the Twin Towers.

We all fear dying on some level, but I think it’s the fear of losing loved ones, more than the fear of leaving this Earth, that grips our heartstrings. The tragedy of that day brought us together as a nation, and while nothing can take away the pain that resulted from those terrorist acts, I wish that unity would return and wipe out the partisanship nature of today’s political landscape.

9-11 Memorial Museum

9-11 Memorial Museum

Entering the museum at ground level, Linda and I walked down the ramp of an introductory exhibit that leads to the original foundation level of the Twin Towers. The atmosphere is dark and somber, appropriate for the space, yet overwhelming with all that is on display. Boxes of Kleenex are placed in various corners, and clearly used.

Tickets, which can be purchased three months in advance, are timed for entrance each day, and run from $15 for Youth (ages 7 to 17) to $24 for adults. If you can plan ahead, admission is free on Tuesday evenings from 5 p.m. to close. Same day tickets are available on a first-come, first-served basis at the ticket window starting at 4:30 p.m., and a limited number of free tickets can be reserved online two weeks in advance. Be sure to get online promptly at 9 a.m. Eastern for those.

After trudging back to the hotel in the rain, we decided to try Rosie O’Grady’s, an old-fashioned steak and seafood place in the Broadway Theatre District (800 7th Avenue at 52nd). There, we had a wonderful dinner, sharing the Braised Spring Lamb Shank with Mashed Yukon Potato ($25.95) and Traditional Fish & Chips with French Fried Potatoes ($20.95).

On our last day, we headed to Lord & Taylor for a touch of old New York department store shopping, then walked around Times Square again before grabbing dinner and catching a show on Broadway.

There’s nothing I love more than musicals, and we were lucky enough to see “Newsies The Musical,” a Disney Theatrical Productions creation inspired by the real-life Newsboys Strike of 1899 in New York, which forced Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst’s newspapers to increase pay for the child labor force that delivered their papers. The line into the theater wound around the block, but amazingly, everyone got in before curtain.

In the musical, newsboy Jack Kelly (Corey Cott) joins forces with reporter Katharine Plumber (Liana Hunt) to fight the greed of newspaper baron Joseph Pulitzer (John Dossett). The two, of course, fall in love in the process. Winner of the 2012 Tony Awards for Best Score and Best Choreography, the show closes on Broadway August 24, and starts a North American tour in October. (For more info, check out http://www.newsiesthemusical.com/.)

The next morning, we left the city under rainy skies, and took an unexpected $110 cab ride back to Newark International Airport. Traffic was slow, with part of the cost being a $20 surcharge since the Yellow Cab driver wasn’t allowed to pick up passengers at Newark on his way back to the city. A car service might have been a better deal, but at least we didn’t have to have to wait in line in the rain.

 

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