June 2, 2017

Random Acts… Pick up a book this summer

Posted in Books, Diversity at 5:11 pm by dinaheng

Whether it’s mystery, fantasy, or romance you’re looking for this summer, all of that and more can be found in a good book. Here are a few that caught my eye for summertime reading…

There are few works of fiction that capture the feel of Asian Americans in our nation’s past in a way that makes you want to research and discover what actually happened beneath the surface of historical tomes.

But Beth Cato’s steampunk adventure “Breath of Earth” (Harper Voyager Books, 383 pgs.) gives an interesting glimpse of what life must have been like for the Chinese at the turn of the century, and for any group that has felt discrimination in any time period.

Cato’s story is set in an alternative 1906, where the United States and Japan have become allies with the shared goal of world domination, beginning with the destruction of China. In this fantasy, geomancers can control the energy of the earth to power airships; Reiki doctors can heal with magic, and women are ever subservient to men.

“Breath of Earth” book cover courtesy of Harper Voyager Books.

When a group of powerful geomancer wardens in San Francisco are assassinated, the only ones left to hold a catastrophic earthquake at bay are Ingrid Carmichael, a headstrong secretary whose power far surpasses those of the men she serves, and her mentor, who is gravely injured.

To clear herself of suspicion, and help her mentor, Ingrid seeks aid from Cy Jennings, a pacifist inventor; Fenris, Jennings’ enigmatic mechanic partner, and Lee, a Chinese friend who is much more than he seems. As the three unravel the mystery behind the assassinations, they discover that the greatest defense against fear is the strength of love and friendship.

When it comes to YA dystopian novels, I tend to pass on most, which offer cookie cutter plots. But Jessica Shirvington caught my eye with her two-part series “Disruption” and now. “Corruption” (HarperCollins, 435 pgs.)

“Corruption” book cover courtesy of HarperCollins.

“Corruption” concludes the story of Maggie Stevens’ hunt for her father and the fight to show the world the lies that M-Corp has woven for its own corporate gain. Now that Maggie has discovered the truth about her father, and has betrayed the love she found in Quentin Mercer, heir to M-Corp’s fortune, she must do whatever it takes to reveal the truth about the insidious company to the world.

With the help of Gus, the world’s best and most sarcastic hacker, Maggie and Quentin discover that nothing is what it seems in the life that both have taken for granted. With parallels to today’s reality — in which business leaders have as much sway over what happens in our democracy as politicians do – “Corruption” shows that greed is usually only stopped by those who have lost it all.

Yet in a world of broken promises, Shirvington’s tale shows that there’s still hope for the future, as long as we have someone worth fighting for in our lives.

“The Girl Who Drank the Moon” by Kelly Barnhill (Algonquin Young Readers, 386 pgs.) may have been written for those 10 years and older, but the captivating fantasy speaks to the child in all of us, sharing wisdom about life, death, and the stories that shape our everyday lives.

“The Girl Who Drank the Moon” book cover courtesy of Algonquin Young Readers.

The 2017 Newbery Medal winner is a novel about a certain way of life… Every year, the people of the Protectorate leave a baby as an offering to a witch to keep her from terrorizing their town. The truth of the matter, though, is that the witch rescues the abandoned babies and gives them to loving families elsewhere.

One year, though, Xan accidentally feeds a baby moonlight, turning her into an extraordinary child filled with magic. When Luna turns 13, the magic locked within begins to emerge, as Xan’s magic begins to fade. When the real reason behind the baby offerings is revealed, the people of the Protectorate learn that evil has lurked in their midst all along, and that the only way to end fear is to stop feeding it.

When Luna finally discovers who her mother is, she helps to shatter the town’s misconceptions, and frees the woman who has grieved for her for years. Loving both her mother and Xan, whom she looks upon as her grandmother, Luna teaches all that “My love isn’t divided. It is multiplied.”

“Carmer and Grit” book cover courtesy of Algonquin Young Readers.

Technology and magic come together when a magician’s apprentice and a one-winged princess unite to battle mechanical creations that threaten the faerie kingdom in “Carmer and Grit – Book One: The Wingsnatchers” by Sarah Jean Horwitz (Algonquin Young Readers, 360 pgs.).

Steampunk for young readers, this tale is the story of what happens when Felix Carmer III, an aspiring inventor and apprentice to Antoine the Amazifier, meets Grit, the stubborn faerie princess who’s unable to fly with one wing, but is determined to do whatever it takes to fight the mysterious menace that is quietly enslaving faeries.

As the two confront a mad scientist whose mechanical inventions are dependent on the magic generated by faeries, Carmer discovers a bravery inside he never knew he had, and Grit learns that shouldering the responsibilities of a princess is way more than pomp and circumstance.

For a summertime escape, check them out.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: